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4 Notes

Corynne Charby - Boule de Flipper

Sabina posted this song a while ago, but I can’t seem to find the link now. I’m a sucker for 80s Europop in general and French girls in particular, so naturally I love this.

There’s just such a relatable vibe to those classic 80s pop sounds, like “my two biggest fears are the persistent threat of nuclear annihilation and my hair not looking fabulous”.

I feel like that all the time.

4 Notes

Cat Power – Nothin But Time

For unfamiliarname. A true posivibes anthem.

727 Notes

theparisreview:

“The novel’s takeaway, for me, is a don’t-look-back realization most teenagers have, at some point, wherein they recognize that everything they thought was the best—or the most important, or the worst thing ever—was actually mundane, trivial. That’s a sobering feeling, even when it comes to the vagaries of young love, the ache that feels like a hole in the stomach.”
J. C. Gabel on remembering Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes on the centenary of its author’s death.

theparisreview:

“The novel’s takeaway, for me, is a don’t-look-back realization most teenagers have, at some point, wherein they recognize that everything they thought was the best—or the most important, or the worst thing ever—was actually mundane, trivial. That’s a sobering feeling, even when it comes to the vagaries of young love, the ache that feels like a hole in the stomach.”

J. C. Gabel on remembering Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes on the centenary of its author’s death.

10 Notes

In the same way that Rolling Stone keeps finding new ways to deify Led Zeppelin, Pitchfork will protect Radiohead’s canonization at all costs. Panning Alt-J is deliberate, though maybe unconscious. It swats away the idea that we’re all getting older and our heroes are getting older and astute listeners who have no inborn respect for our cultural junk are finding new bands to love. No one has to love Alt-J, but offering them up as “the next Radiohead” only to knock them down for not measuring up to the title doesn’t account for the way they’ve connected to a massive audience and doesn’t explore the writer’s own biases and fears.
Don’t care much about Alt-J personally, but I feel barrybailbondsman, parklakespeakers and juanalikesmusic raised some interesting points in regards to Pitchfork’s review of them.

21 Notes

The Hospital Diaries, pt. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • Doctor: Okay, so that's basically what we're going to do in the next couple of weeks. I'm sure you have a lot of questions for me right now!?
  • Me: Yeah. Is there gonna be Wi-Fi?
  • ***
  • Alright guys, checking in/out for a while. I hope I'll find out about the Wi-Fi soon, because apparently the doctor seemed to think I was joking!? Way to not assuage your patient's deepest fears there, buddy.
  • Anyhow, keep things tidy!

11 Notes

Goodbye Golfie

image

Sold the first car I ever owned this week. Thanks for the memories, Golfie. U took me so far but now the time has come to upgrade U.

As a German, parting from your first car is the ultimate traumatic experience, so please keep me in your thoughts in these difficult moments…

10 Notes

I feel that, unless you listen to and review music for a living, it’s rather hard to find the time or inclination to actively engage with more than one or two new albums per week. (Which seems like a perfectly healthy amount of new music to begin with!)

But you do tend to gravitate to the bigger name releases, the BNMs, the albums everyone’s talking about, and give cursory glances at best to whatever else might float your fancy. So despite Jennifer Castle being featured on NPR and beautifully written-up on one of my favourite music blogs, I’d probably have missed this record had it not been for Britt talking about it approvingly on Twitter and me serendipitously deciding to take the plunge and seek it out. 

And what a beautiful record it is, taking the folk songbook from sparse to orchestral to country twang. If you’re into folk music of any variety, do seek out Pink City and give it a spin whenever you find a quiet moment. I think it’s a very fine record indeed.

"I don’t need a home/ don’t need a lover/ I’ll be out on my own/ Come hell or high water."

2396 Notes

deadpresidents:

whitehouse:

The President’s desk.

I love the fact that everything on the President’s desk looks like a cheap Hollywood prop. That folder might as well just say “STUFF 4 THE PREZ”.

deadpresidents:

whitehouse:

The President’s desk.

I love the fact that everything on the President’s desk looks like a cheap Hollywood prop. That folder might as well just say “STUFF 4 THE PREZ”.

14 Notes

sarahfonder:

So I forgot to post this on Monday when it originally got published, but I wrote a critique of American Beauty for its 15th anniversary over at Decider. It’s gotten a lot of creepy, MRA-type comments, but I wouldn’t know what they say because I’m avoiding the comments! Anyway, I’m proud of this article, so check it out.

Rightfully proud! Enjoyed reading this.

sarahfonder:

So I forgot to post this on Monday when it originally got published, but I wrote a critique of American Beauty for its 15th anniversary over at Decider. It’s gotten a lot of creepy, MRA-type comments, but I wouldn’t know what they say because I’m avoiding the comments! Anyway, I’m proud of this article, so check it out.

Rightfully proud! Enjoyed reading this.

11 Notes


On Sept. 8, 1979, Jean Seberg’s body was found naked in the back of a Renault parked on a Paris side street, the death credited to an overdose of barbiturates. 
Six days after the discovery of Seberg’s body, the FBI released documents under FOIA admitting the defamation of Seberg. During the late 1960s, Seberg provided financial support to various groups supporting civil rights, such as the NAACP and Native American school groups.
The FBI was upset about several gifts to the Black Panther Party, totalling US$10,500 (estimated) in contributions; these were noted among a list of other celebrities in FBI internal documents later declassified and released to the public under FOIA requests. The financial support and alleged interracial love affairs or friendships are thought to have been triggers to a large-scale FBI program deployment in her direction.
The FBI operation against Seberg used COINTELPRO program techniques to harass, intimidate, defame, and discredit Seberg. The FBI’s stated goal was an unspecified “neutralization” of Seberg with a subsidiary objective to “cause her embarrassment and serve to cheapen her image with the public”, while taking the “usual precautions to avoid identification of the Bureau”.
In 1970, the FBI created the false story, from a San Francisco-based informant, that the child Seberg was carrying was not fathered by her husband Romain Gary but by Raymond Hewitt, a member of the Black Panther Party.
The investigation of Seberg went far beyond the publishing of defamatory articles. According to her friends interviewed after her death, Seberg experienced years of aggressive in-person surveillance (constant stalking), as well as break-ins and other intimidation-oriented activity.

On Sept. 8, 1979, Jean Seberg’s body was found naked in the back of a Renault parked on a Paris side street, the death credited to an overdose of barbiturates. 

Six days after the discovery of Seberg’s body, the FBI released documents under FOIA admitting the defamation of Seberg. During the late 1960s, Seberg provided financial support to various groups supporting civil rights, such as the NAACP and Native American school groups.

The FBI was upset about several gifts to the Black Panther Party, totalling US$10,500 (estimated) in contributions; these were noted among a list of other celebrities in FBI internal documents later declassified and released to the public under FOIA requests. The financial support and alleged interracial love affairs or friendships are thought to have been triggers to a large-scale FBI program deployment in her direction.

The FBI operation against Seberg used COINTELPRO program techniques to harass, intimidate, defame, and discredit Seberg. The FBI’s stated goal was an unspecified “neutralization” of Seberg with a subsidiary objective to “cause her embarrassment and serve to cheapen her image with the public”, while taking the “usual precautions to avoid identification of the Bureau”.

In 1970, the FBI created the false story, from a San Francisco-based informant, that the child Seberg was carrying was not fathered by her husband Romain Gary but by Raymond Hewitt, a member of the Black Panther Party.

The investigation of Seberg went far beyond the publishing of defamatory articles. According to her friends interviewed after her death, Seberg experienced years of aggressive in-person surveillance (constant stalking), as well as break-ins and other intimidation-oriented activity.

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